Simpson Street Flailer Scares Children

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(THUNDER BAY, ON) – Since being featured on TRCCTB.COM, two notorious flailers have stopped flailing out in public where kids could see them. Let’s try to knock down this new one before it does anymore harm.

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We received an anonymous tip that there was a new flailer in town. We got the video at the end of this article.

Our tipster, who wants to remain anonymous tells us that this, what we assume is a woman, flails out quite frequently in her neighbourhood making it difficult to allow her kid to stand outside for the bus. Today the woman was dancing and screeching into the bag on the ground.

The woman left her house and walked up to the flailer to catch this video.

She’s pleading for it to end. Her house is up for sale and she’s looking for a new residence in a better area.

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Flailers, listen up, the community would prefer if you don’t flail out in public. There are kids terrified and don’t understand what is happening. Keep your flails indoors.

Below is the video. Stay safe citizens and report any crimes or suspicious activity directly to our email at tips@trcctb.com

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14 Replies to “Simpson Street Flailer Scares Children”

  1. Looks more like “stretch and bend” exercises. Got to keep in shape you know…..

    When the welfare runs out, the flailing will likely slow down until the next check comes.

  2. I really don’t understand all this flailing. I know it’s from drugs. But what exactly? Meth, bath salts or both?

    Surely they must know that whatever they are taking flailing is a common side effect. I don’t understand how anyone can find this enjoyable. I wonder if they are aware they are flailing and if they enjoy it?

    1. It’s a side effect of the “purple down” which makes a user entirely restless and unable to stop moving.. “flailing”
      Ive seen some wild flailing.. utterly comedic

  3. Actually this body movement ( Hypokinetic, hyperkinetic disorder, a neurological disease . Can be brought on when mixing Cocaine and fentynol together. So really it’s not her fault she acts this way , and couldn’t stop if she tried. Addicts like these need serious mental help , unfortunately we don’t have this help in Thunder Bay ! And until that happens Thunder Bay is only going to get worse.

    1. It’s not her fault? Did someone force her to take damaging drugs until she became a flailing addict?

      That’s the problem with this liberal, irresponsible attitude of society today. No one has to ante up for their behaviour. It’s always someone else’s fault when people choose to do stupid things like playing with highly addictive drugs.

      What’s the thought process there? “Let’s start shooting addictive drugs into my body and see what happens?” Even a slow six year old knows the outcome of that decision.

      Taking drugs is a choice. A bad one. Some people are simply weak in character and obviously stupid to make the decision to get into taking powerfully addictive drugs. Their fate is in their hands. Unfortunately, the rest of us have to pay for and put up with these social parasite outcasts among us.

  4. dumb motha****ers need to stop sayin flakka. if it was flakka theyd be trying to eat you or do some crazy shit like jump through a window.

  5. Bulls**t its not her fault..i am trying with urgency to get my daughter out of this neighbourhood….her children have to be constantly subjected to this everyday and it terrifies me…

  6. Pino, Well your question is valid but the answer is not as easy as many folks think. There are many reasons drug addicts get hooked but once hooked it isn’t easy to become clean. I am not an expert the how’s and whys of drug addictions but I do know that it is not something that can simply be stopped by self will in most cases. Those who truly wish to stop really need professional help and the fact is that this help is in such short supply most of the addicts simply keep going to the dealers to feed the addiction and thus fall deeper and deeper into the abyss. They deserve our compassion and not our condemnation.

    1. Can’t agree with you there Laura.

      These people will push the system to the breaking point for drugs. Often ending up on the wrong side of the law, which pretty much forces them into rehab. Even if we spend tens of thousands trying to detox these people, the majority of them go right back to the habit. How much “compassion” are we willing to throw out the window on trying to rehabilitate addicts who will never change?

      Our family put up with a law breaking, thieving, robbing, violent addict for decades. Every day we worried whether or not he’d end up dead or even worse, killing someone else. He stole from us and people we knew, lied, cheated and injured people when he wasn’t doing time in the pen (almost 30 years off and on). He brought sadness, sorrow and shame to the family for 45 years until he was too sick from needle born diseases to carry on the way he had. The only time the family was at ease was when he was locked up. He finally died a few years ago. Can’t say there was a wet eye in the entire family. More of a sense of deep sorrow for a life well wasted and a sigh of relief that his reign of terror was over with.

      If you had lived with that in your lifetime, I’d be willing to bet you’d be considerably less sympathetic for these chronic social burdens.

    1. Red, While I empathize with you regarding your family member who was an addict I also had several alcoholics in my family who made life miserable and worrisome for all involved. They were all war veterans who returned from the two worlds wars mentally damaged by the experience. They all found some solace in booze. Perhaps with help they might have been able to stop the self inflicted damage but in those days none was available. In our household booze was always available and it followed that I also flirted with alcohol addiction. I serously doubt that anyone addicted to drugs does so without some underlying trauma in their lives much like my family members. What are the solutions? Does society lock them up in more and bigger prisons until they sober up and then release them only to have the cycle repeated? Do we simply allow them to die on the streets and alleys? If we do either of these choices the problem will not be be solved and no one will be cured so is it not better to try to provide some form of help to deal with the underlying root cause so that these addicts can recover. My family members who were addicts most surely suffered from PTSD and had that been recognized and treated perhaps the alcohol addiction would not have happened.

  7. Rex I do agree with what you just said. I too lived with a family member who had a addiction and they take over the whole family from their excuses it’s not my fault it’s everyone else’s to pushing the family apart. It was hell and so hard mentally and physically to live through. They lied, stealed, and blamed everyone else and turned the family into chaos. It was their choice to go this way but they bring other people down with them. When this person died from their addiction it was relief. All the conflict was over. Sorry but that’s how we felt. We mourned the person we knew as a child but not person they had become.

    1. Im not sure if I’m replying to the intire board or just your comment..its ment for everyone ..sorry.
      I want to know why these dealers are not getting put away. I know for a fact they(police) know drugs are coming and going out of the hotspots..they have stoped people coming out of these houses over and over again and yet the drugs are coming in and leaving. Surveillance. I’ve watched it happen..the dealers aren’t being punished. And it’s sickening to know that they(dealers) dont care about anyone. As long as you have money. They will watch you die daily in your addiction. I’ve had handfuls of friends suffering with addiction..and many that have died from it.
      The cops know the house. Do something.

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