TWO HUNTERS SLAMMED FOR VIOLATIONS

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(THUNDER BAY, ON) – Two moose hunters were fined for hunting violations in the Red Lake area.

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Terry Petropoulos of Markham pleaded guilty and was fined $2,500 for hunting a bull moose without a licence, $1,200 for shooting across a roadway and $500 for allowing a moose to become unsuitable for human consumption. He also received a one-year hunting suspension.

Leo Cossetto of Newmarket pleaded guilty to hunting moose without a licence and was fined $1,000.

Court heard that on October 23, 2017, conservation officers conducted a moose decoy operation in the Red Lake area to address party hunting violations and unsafe hunting from roadways.

Petropoulos was hunting alone and observed the bull moose decoy from his vehicle. He exited the vehicle and, while standing on the road, fired once across the other lane of traffic at the decoy.

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It was determined that he did not have a bull moose licence and was only licensed to hunt calf moose. Further investigation revealed that he was over 11 kilometres away from the other members of his hunting party who had the bull moose seal.

Officers inspected Cossetto, who was a member of the hunting party, later in the day. They found that he had harvested a cow moose earlier that week and had placed his game seal on that cow moose.

He was continuing to hunt moose with other members of his hunting group but was greater than five kilometres away from the hunters in his group. 

It was also determined the cow moose the party had harvested earlier that week became unsuitable for human consumption as proper precautions were not taken in handling the moose after it was harvested.

Justice of the Pease Daisy Hoppe heard the case in the Ontario Court of Justice, Red Lake, on July 18, 2018.

To report a natural resources violation, call the MNRF TIPS line at 1-877-847-7667toll-free any time or contact your local ministry office during regular business hours.

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You can also call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). And visit Ontario.ca/mnrftips to view an interactive, searchable map of unsolved cases. You may be able to provide information that will help solve a case.

Source: Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.

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