CSO Breach and Possession of Ammunition While Prohibited

(FORT FRANCES, ON) – Hardworking officers with the Fort Frances detachment of the Ontario Provincial Police have once again arrested a 28-year-old Justin Rose. Rose was on a conditional sentence order, which means he was allowed to serve his sentence in the community rather than in jail. A conditional sentence order often has rehabilitative aspects to it such as counselling and other programs to hopefully correct the behaviour which landed the perp a sentence in the first place.
Allegations arose that Rose had violated his CSO and that he had possession of ammunition, although he has two active court orders not to possess any weapons or ammunition, one for 10 years and one for a lifetime.
Rose appeared in a Thunder Bay Courthouse (A.K.A. “The In and Out Day Spa”) courtroom this morning via telephone call from the Fort Frances OPP detachment. Presiding over court matters today was His Worship, Justice of the Peace Marcel Donio, Crown Attorney P. Pasloski and a duty counsel representative Mary Thompson. Rose is facing the following charges:

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  • CSO Breach.
  • Possession of ammunition while prohibited (10 year ban)
  • Possession of ammunition while prohibited (lifetime ban)

Rose is no stranger to the criminal justice system. He is not allowed release from jail today and is scheduled to return to a Fort Frances bail court on Tuesday, October 15th, 2019 for another swing at bail. His significant other “Melissa”, was supposed to be at the police station but wasn’t there at the time the matter was heard. He will be transported to the Fort Frances Jail, where he will sit pretty until at least Tuesday, when he has another shot at bail.

When someone is granted a “conditional sentence order”, meaning they can serve their sentence from their home under basically house-arrest conditions, they run the risk of serving the remainder of their sentence in a real jail, should they breach the terms of their CSO. Typically, as the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled, Canadian Judges are too soft on criminals. Judges must follow the law and case law when handing out these sentences. If we want our Judges to be harder on criminals, we need to give them the tools to do so.

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